Acrostic Poem for PSALMS

Poems From Oostburg, Wisconsin

P  romises of
S  erenity
A  nd
L  ove
M  editations and
S  trength

The Psalms have been with me for as long as I can remember. I wrote the acrostic in 2010.

The Psalms are ever-new – they apply to whatever life is asking of me – yet also are comforting because I have been reading a long time.

Thou tellest my wanderings:
put thou my tears into thy bottle:
are they not in thy book?

Psalm 56: 8 (KJV)

Thy statutes have been my songs
in the house of my pilgrimage.

Psalm 119: 54 (KJV)

The Psalms inspire me to write poems.

reading Psalms
in the sunroom
fragrance of daffodils

rereading Psalms
colors of leaves
a deeper gold

Wait on the Lord:
be of good courage,
and he shall strengthen thine heart:
wait, I say, on the Lord
.

Psalm 27:14 (KJV)

The image is from Crafter’s Cornucopia and…

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Creative Notes: Two Books

I am reading A Moment’s Longing, Haiku Society of America Members’ Anthology 2019. Tanya McDonald served as our Editor this year. Please visit the Haiku Society of America for more information.

My poem in the book:

one red tulip
blooms in the hosta border
time alone with God

Another new book I am reading this year is Walking the Fence: Selected Tanka of Randy Brooks (2019, Brooks Books; Taylorville, Illinois). Please visit Brooks Books Haiku for more information.

Ellen Grace Olinger

Haiku – Summer 2019

You are welcome to reprint my poems with proper credit. Ideas include bulletin boards in classrooms, libraries, hospitals, nursing homes – places where a short poem may be an encouragement to someone or help with a poetry lesson. Thank you.

summer
early sun fills
a bouquet of flowers

summer sun
thrift store bowl painted
with leaves and fruit

Friday morning
fresh water
for the daisies

Saturday morning
so happy with the plants
we bought on sale

early Sunday
raindrops in some light
on evergreen branches

early morning
hosta flowers grow
above the windowsill

peaceful morning
a prayer from childhood
still with me

Ellen Grace Olinger